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RG 2020-12 Wildlife Division Reports, 2016-2019


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A sample of waterfowl hunters was contacted after the 2018 hunting seasons to estimate hunting activity and determine their opinions and satisfaction with hunting regulations. 

A survey was completed to determine the number of harvest tag holders who set traps for marten and fisher, the number of animals caught, the types of traps used, and the number of days spent trapping.

A sample of furtakers was contacted after the 2018 hunting and trapping seasons to estimate the number of participants, days afield (effort), and furbearer harvests. Information from harvest surveys, mandatory registration, and other indices are used to monitor furbearer populations and help establish harvest regulations.

DNR's Wildlife Division contacted a random sample of bear hunters after the 2018 hunting season to determine hunter participation, hunting methods, bear harvest, and hunter satisfaction. 

A survey was completed to determine the number of people hunting sharp-tailed grouse, the number of days hunting, and the number of sharp-tailed grouse harvested in Michigan.

A survey was completed to determine the number of people hunting and trapping bobcats in Michigan, the number of days spent afield (effort), and the number of bobcats registered. 

A survey was completed to determine whether hunters supported a study to investigate the effects of mandatory antler point restrictions (i.e., four points on a side) on Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) among the deer in the 5 county Core CWD Area (Ionia, Kent, Mecosta, Montcalm, and Newaygo counties). About 63% of the people hunting deer in the 5-county Core CWD Area supported the mandatory APRs and 68% supported conducting a study to investigate the effects of these mandatory APRs.

Hunter cooperator surveys, spring breeding surveys, and mail harvest surveys are conducted each year to monitor ruffed grouse and American woodcock populations.

The main objectives of this harvest survey were to determine the number of trappers who set traps for otter (Lontra canadensis), the types of traps used, the number of days they trapped, and the number of animals captured. Because otter trappers frequently seek to catch beaver (Castor canadensis), they also were asked whether they attempted to trap beaver. If they trapped beaver, they were asked to report the number of days they trapped and the number of beaver caught. 

A survey of turkey hunters was conducted following the 2019 spring hunting season to determine turkey harvest and hunter participation. 

A survey was completed to estimate the number of people hunting small game species, their days afield, and harvest during the 2017 hunting seasons. The survey also was used to investigate hunter satisfaction, to measure compliance with the Harvest Information Program (HIP), to estimate the number of people hunting on Hunting Access Program (HAP) lands and on Grouse Enhanced Management Sites (GEMS), and to estimate the number of hunters using the internet application Mi-Hunt to locate hunting areas. 

A survey was completed to determine the number of harvest tag holders who set traps for marten and fisher, the number of animals caught, the types of traps used, and the number of days spent trapping. 

A survey was completed to determine the number of harvest tag holders who set traps for marten and fisher, the number of animals caught, the types of traps used, and the number of days spent trapping.

A survey of deer hunters was conducted following the 2018 hunting seasons to estimate hunter participation, harvest, and hunting effort. Estimates derived from harvest surveys and information from deer harvest check stations, trends in deer-vehicle collisions, population modeling, and input received from the public are used to monitor deer populations and establish harvest regulations.

A survey was completed to determine the number of people hunting and trapping bobcats in Michigan, the number of days spent afield (effort), and the number of bobcats registered. Estimates derived from harvest surveys, as well as information from mandatory registration reports, field surveys, and population modeling are used to monitor bobcat populations and establish harvest regulations.

A sample of furtakers was contacted after the 2016 hunting and trapping seasons to estimate the number of participants, days afield (effort), and furbearer harvests. Information from harvest surveys, mandatory registration, and other indices are used to monitor furbearer populations and help establish harvest regulations.

A survey was completed to determine the number of otter harvest tag holders that set traps for otter and beaver, the number of animals caught, the types of traps used, and the number of days they trapped.

This publication consists of research papers presented at the 10th American Woodcock Symposium held in Roscommon, Michigan in 2006. Topics covered include habitat, hunter activity, population, and migration.

A sample of furtakers was contacted after the 2017 hunting and trapping seasons to estimate the number of participants, days afield (effort), and furbearer harvests. Information from harvest surveys, mandatory registration, and other indices are used to monitor furbearer populations and help establish harvest regulations.

Elk hunters were contacted after the 2018 hunting season to estimate hunter participation, hunter satisfaction, and elk seen and harvested. 

A survey was completed to determine the number of people hunting sharp-tailed grouse, the number of days hunting, and the number of sharp-tailed grouse harvested in Michigan.

Elk hunters were contacted after the 2017 hunting season to estimate hunter participation, hunter satisfaction, and elk seen and harvested. 

A survey of turkey hunters was conducted following the 2018 spring hunting season to determine turkey harvest and hunter participation. 

Several surveys are conducted each year to monitor ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), including hunter cooperator survey (2017-2018), mail-carrier brood survey (2018-2019) and harvest survey (2013-2015). 

The main objectives of this harvest survey were to determine the number of trappers who set traps for otter (Lontra canadensis), the types of traps used, the number of days they trapped, and the number of animals captured. Because otter trappers frequently seek to catch beaver (Castor canadensis), they also were asked whether they attempted to trap beaver. If they trapped beaver, they were asked to report the number of days they trapped and the number of beaver caught.

A sample of waterfowl hunters was contacted after the 2016 hunting seasons to estimate hunting activity and determine opinions and satisfaction with hunting regulations. Harvest surveys are one of the management tools used by the Wildlife Division in developing regulations. Estimating harvest and hunting effort are among the primary objectives of these surveys. Estimates derived from harvest surveys, as well as breeding bird abundance and population models, are used to develop harvest regulations that provide sustainable recreational hunting and viewing opportunities of migratory game birds. Wildlife management agencies also consider hunter opinions when establishing regulations. 

A survey was completed to determine the number of people hunting and trapping bobcats in Michigan, the number of days spent afield (effort), and the number of bobcats registered. Estimates derived from harvest surveys, as well as information from mandatory registration reports, field surveys, and population modeling are used to monitor bobcat populations and establish harvest regulations.

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